Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.6 release

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.6.

Changelog:

  • Added new RDS instance classes to RDS scripts.
  • Added boto profile support to RDS scripts.
  • Added AWS region support and ability to specify all regions to RDS scripts.
  • Added ability to set AWS region and boto profile on data source level in Cacti.
  • Added period, average time and debug options to pmp-check-aws-rds.py.
  • Added ability to override Nginx server status URL path on data source level in Cacti.
  • Made Memcached and Redis host configurable for Cacti script.
  • Added the ability to lookup the master’s server_id when using pt-heartbeat with pmp-check-mysql-replication-delay.
  • Changed how memory stats are collected by Cacti script and pmp-check-unix-memory.
    Now /proc/meminfo is parsed instead of running free command. This also fixes pmp-check-unix-memory for EL7.
  • Set default MySQL connect timeout to 5s for Cacti script. Can be overridden in the config.
  • Fixed innodb transactions count on the Cacti graph for MySQL 5.6 and higher.
  • Fixed –login-path option in Nagios scripts when using it along with other credential options.

Thanks to contributors: David Andruczyk, Denis Baklikov, Mischa ter Smitten, Mitch Hagstrand.

The project is fully hosted on Github now including issues and Launchpad project is discontinued.

A new tarball is available from downloads area or in packages from our software repositories. The plugins are fully supported for customers with a Percona Support contract and free installation services are provided as part of some contracts. You can find links to the documentation, forums and more at the project homepage.

Percona Monitoring PluginsAbout Percona Monitoring Plugins
Percona Monitoring Plugins are monitoring and graphing components designed to integrate seamlessly with widely deployed solutions such as Nagios, Cacti and Zabbix.

Read more at: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/

Percona Server 5.5.47-37.7 is now available

Percona Server 5.5.47-37.7
Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.5.47-37.7 on January 12, 2016. Based on MySQL 5.5.47, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.5.47-37.7 is now the current stable release in the 5.5 series.

Percona Server is open-source and free. Details of the release can be found in the 5.5.47-37.7 milestone on Launchpad. Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories.

Bugs Fixed:

  • Running OPTIMIZE TABLE or ALTER TABLE without the ENGINE clause would silently change table engine if enforce_storage_engine variable was active. This could also result in system tables being changed to incompatible storage engines, breaking server operation. Bug fixed #1488055.

Other bugs fixed: #1179451, #1524763, and #1530102.

Release notes for Percona Server 5.5.47-37.7 are available in our online documentation. Bugs can be reported on the launchpad bug tracker.

Read more at: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/

Percona Server 5.6.28-76.1 is now available

Percona Server 5.6.28-76.1Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.6.28-76.1 on January 12, 2016. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or from the Percona Software Repositories.

Based on MySQL 5.6.28, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.6.28-76.1 is the current GA release in the Percona Server 5.6 series. Percona Server is open-source and free – and this is the latest release of our enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Complete details of this release can be found in the 5.6.28-76.1 milestone on Launchpad.

Bugs Fixed:

  • Clustering secondary index could not be created on a partitioned TokuDB table. Bug fixed #1527730 (DB-720).
  • When enabled, super-read-only option could break statement-based replication while executing a multi-table update statement on a slave. Bug fixed #1441259.
  • Running OPTIMIZE TABLE or ALTER TABLE without the ENGINE clause would silently change table engine if enforce_storage_engine variable was active. This could also result in system tables being changed to incompatible storage engines, breaking server operation. Bug fixed #1488055.
  • Setting the innodb_sched_priority_purge variable (available only in debug builds) while purge threads were stopped would cause a server crash. Bug fixed #1368552.
  • Small buffer pool size could cause XtraDB buffer flush thread to spin at 100% CPU. Bug fixed #1433432.
  • Enabling TokuDB with ps_tokudb_admin script inside the Docker container would cause an error due to insufficient privileges even when running as root. In order for this script to be used inside Docker containers this error has be been changed to a warning that a check is impossible. Bug fixed #1520890.
  • InnoDB status will start printing negative values for spin rounds per wait, if the wait number, even though being accounted as a signed 64-bit integer, will not fit into a signed 32-bit integer. Bug fixed #1527160 (upstream #79703).

Other bugs fixed: #1384595 (upstream #74579), #1384658 (upstream #74619), #1471141 (upstream #77705), #1179451, #1524763 and #1530102.

Release notes for Percona Server 5.6.28-76.1 are available in the online documentation. Please report any bugs on the launchpad bug tracker .

Read more at: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/

The language of compression

Leif Walsh & friends

Leif Walsh will talk about the language of compression at Percona Live Amsterdam

Storage. Everyone needs it. Whether your data is in MySQL, a NoSQL, or somewhere in the cloud, with ever-growing data volumes – along with the need for SSDs to cut latency and replication to provide insurance – an organization’s storage footprint is an important place to look for savings. That’s where compression comes in (squeeze!) to save disk space.

Two Sigma software engineer Leif Walsh speaks the language of compression. Fluently. In fact, he’ll be speaking on

that exact subject September 22 during the Percona Live conference in Amsterdam.

I asked him about his talk, and about Amsterdam, the other day. Here’s what he had to say.

* * *

Tom: Hi Leif, how will your talk help IT decision-makers cut through the marketing mumbo-jumbo on what’s important to focus on and what is not
Leif: My talk will have three lessons aimed at those making storage decisions for their company:

  1. What are the key factors to consider when evaluating storage options, and how can they affect your bottom line?  This is not only how storage tech influences your hardware, operations, and management costs, but also how it can facilitate new development initiatives and cut time-to-market for your products.
  2. How should you read benchmarks and marketing materials about storage technology?  You’ll learn what to look for in promotional material, and how to think critically about whether that material is applicable to your business needs.
  3. What’s the most effective way to communicate with storage vendors about your application’s requirements?  A lot of time can be spent in the early stages of a relationship in finding a common language for users and vendors to have meaningful discussions about users’ needs and vendors’ capacity to meet those needs.  With the tools you’ll learn in my talk, you’ll be able to accelerate quickly to the high-bandwidth conversations you need to have in order to make the right decision, and consequently, you’ll be empowered to evaluate more choices to find the best one faster.

Tom: In addition to IT decision-makers, who else should attend your session and what will they take away afterward?
Leif: My talk is primarily about the language that everyone in the storage community should be using to communicate. Therefore, storage vendors should attend to get ideas for how  to express their benchmarks and their system’s properties more effectively, and application developers and operations people will learn strategies for getting better support and for making a convincing case to the decision makers in their own company.

Tom: Which session(s) are you most looking forward to besides your own?
Leif: Sam Kottler is a good friend and an intensely experienced systems engineer with a dynamic and boisterous personality, so I can’t wait to hear more about his experiences with Linux tuning.

As one of the original developers of TokuMX, I’ll absolutely have to check out Stephane’s talk about it, but I promise not to heckle. Charity Majors is always hilarious and has great experiences and insights to share, so I’ll definitely check out her talk too.

* * *

Catch Leif’s talk at Percona Live in Amsterdam September 21-23. Enter the promo code “BlogInterview” at registration and save €20! Register now!

The post The language of compression appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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Featured Talk: The Future of Replication is Today: New Features in Practice

In the past years, both MySQL 5.6, MySQL 5.7 and MariaDB 10 have been successful implementing new features. For many DBAs, the “old way” of replicating data is comfortable so taking the action to implement these new features seems like a momentous leap rather then a simple step. But perhaps it isn’t that complicated…

Giuseppe Maxia, a Quality Assurance Architect at VMware and loyal member of the Percona Live Confepercona-2015DSC_4112rence Committee will be presenting “The Future of Replication is Today: New Features in Practice” at the Percona Live Data Performance Conference this September in Amsterdam.
Percona’s Community Manager, Tom Diederich had an opportunity to catch up with Giuseppe last week and get an in-depth look at some of the items Giuseppe will be covering in his talk in addition to getting his take on some of the hot sessions to hit while at the conference.  This is how it went:

(Hint: Read to the end to find a special discount code) 

 

Tom: Your talk is titled, “The Future of Replication is today: new features in practice.” What are the top 3 areas in which replication options have improved in MySQL 5.6, MySQL 5.7, and MariaDB 10?
Giuseppe: Replication has been stagnant for over 10 years. Before MySQL 5.6, the only important change in the technology was the introduction of row-based replication in 2008. After that, we had to wait till 2013 to see global transaction identifiers in MySQL 5.6, followed by the same feature, with different implementation in 2014 with MariaDB 10. GTID has been complemented, in both flavors, with crash-safe replication tables, which is a feature that guarantees a reliable resume of replication after a server failure. There is also the parallel applier, a minor feature that has been implemented in both MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB, and improved in latest versions, although it seems to lack proper support for monitoring. The last feature that was introduced in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 10 is multi-source replication, i.e. the ability of replicating from multiple masters to a single slave. In both editions, the implementation is quite simple, and not so different from what DBAs are used to do for regular replication.
Tom: For DBAs, how difficult will it be to make the change from the “old way” of replicating data — to stop using the same comfortable features that have been around for several years — and put into practice some of the latest features?
Giuseppe: The adoption of new features can be deceptively simple. For example, GTID in MariaDB comes out of the box and its adoption could be as easy as running a backup followed by a restore, but it can produce unpleasant results if you try to combine this feature with multi-source replication without planning ahead. That said, the transition could be simpler than its counterpart in MySQL.
MySQL 5.6 and 5.7 require some reconfiguration to run GTID, and users can face unpleasant failures due to the complexity of the rules applying to this feature. They will need to read the manual thoroughly and test the deployment extensively before trusting an upgrade in production.
For multi-source replication, the difficulties are, in my experience, hidden in the users expectations. When speaking about multi-source (or multi-masters, as it is commonly referred to), many users have the mistaken expectation that they can easily insert anything in multiple masters as if they were doing it in a single server. However, the nature of asynchronous replication and the current implementation of multi-source topologies do not handle conflicts, and this fact will probably surprise and anger the early adopters.
Tom: What is still missing in replication technology? How can MySQL improve?
Giuseppe: There are two areas where the current implementation is lacking. The first one is monitoring data: while new features have been adding up to replication, there is not enough effort made to cover the monitoring needs. The current way of monitoring replication is hard-wired around the original replication feature, and little has been done to give the users a deeper view of what is going on. With the latest releases at our disposal, we can run parallel replication using multiple masters, and yet we have very little visibility on what goes on inside the dozen of threads that the new features can unchain inside a single slave. It’s like driving a F1 racing car with the dashboard of a Ford model-T. MySQL 5.7 has moved a few steps in that direction, with the new replication tables in performance_schema, but it is still a drop in the ocean compared to what we need.
The second area where replication is still too much tied with its past is in heterogeneous replication. While relational databases are still dominating the front-end of the web economy, its back-end is largely being run by different structures, such as Hadoop, MongoDB, Cassandra. Moving data back and forth between the relational storage and its growing siblings has become an urgent need. There have been a few sparks of change in this direction, but nothing that can qualify as promising changes.
Tom: Which other session(s) are you most looking forward to besides your own?
Giuseppe: I am always interested in the sessions that explain and discuss new features. I am most interested in the talks by Oracle engineers, who have been piling up many features in the latest years, and I am sure they have something more up their sleeve that will appear at the conference. I also attend eagerly sessions about complementary tools, which are usually highly educational and often give me more ideas.

Want to read more on the topic? Visit Giuseppe’s blog:

 MySQL Replication Monitoring 101

The Percona Live Data Performance Conference is the premier event for the rich and diverse MySQL, NoSQL and data in the cloud ecosystems in Europe. It is the place to be for the open source community as well as businesses that thrive in the MySQL, NoSQL, cloud, big data and IoT (Internet of Things) marketplaces. Attendees include DBAs, sysadmins, developers, architects, CTOs, CEOs, and vendors from around the world.

This year’s conference will feature one day of tutorials and two days of keynote talks and breakout sessions related to MySQL, NoSQL and Data in the Cloud. Attendees will get briefed on the hottest topics, learn about building and maintaining high-performing deployments and hear from top industry leaders.

The Percona Live Europe Data Performance Conference will be September 21-23 at the Mövenpick Hotel Amsterdam City Centre.

Register using code “FeaturedTalk” and save 20 euros off of registration!

Hope to see you in Amsterdam!

The post Featured Talk: The Future of Replication is Today: New Features in Practice appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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Percona Toolkit 2.2.15 is now available

Percona ToolkitPercona is pleased to announce the availability of Percona Toolkit 2.2.15.  Released August 28, 2015. Percona Toolkit is a collection of advanced command-line tools to perform a variety of MySQL server and system tasks that are too difficult or complex for DBAs to perform manually. Percona Toolkit, like all Percona software, is free and open source.

This release is the current GA (Generally Available) stable release in the 2.2 series. It includes multiple bug fixes as well as continued preparation for MySQL 5.7 compatibility. Full details are below. Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories.

New Features:

  • Added --max-flow-ctl option to pt-online-schema-change and pt-archiver with a value set in percent. When a Percona XtraDB Cluster node is very loaded, it sends flow control signals to the other nodes to stop sending transactions in order to catch up. When the average value of time spent in this state (in percent) exceeds the maximum provided in the option, the tool pauses until it falls below again.Default is no flow control checking.
  • Added the --sleep option for pt-online-schema-change to avoid performance problems. The option accepts float values in seconds.
  • Implemented ability to specify --check-slave-lag multiple times for pt-archiver. The following example enables lag checks for two slaves:
    pt-archiver --no-delete --where '1=1' --source h=oltp_server,D=test,t=tbl --dest h=olap_server --check-slave-lag h=slave1 --check-slave-lag h=slave2 --limit 1000 --commit-each
  • Added the --rds option to pt-kill, which makes the tool use Amazon RDS procedure calls instead of the standard MySQL kill command.

Bugs Fixed:

  • Fixed bug 1042727: pt-table-checksum doesn’t reconnect the slave $dbh
    Before, the tool would die if any slave connection was lost. Now the tool waits forever for slaves.
  • Fixed bug 1056507: pt-archiver --check-slave-lag agressiveness
    The tool now checks replication lag every 100 rows instead of every row, which significantly improves efficiency.
  • Fixed bug 1215587: Adding underscores to constraints when using pt-online-schema-change can create issues with constraint name length
    Before, multiple schema changes lead to underscores stacking up on the name of the constraint until it reached the 64 character limit. Now there is a limit of two underscores in the prefix, then the tool alternately removes or adds one underscore, attempting to make the name unique.
  • Fixed bug 1277049pt-online-schema-change can’t connect with comma in password
    For all tools, documented that commas in passwords provided on the command line must be escaped.
  • Fixed bug 1441928: Unlimited chunk size when using pt-online-schema-change with --chunk-size-limit=0 inhibits checksumming of single-nibble tables
    When comparing table size with the slave table, the tool now ignores --chunk-size-limit if it is set to zero to avoid multiplying by zero.
  • Fixed bug 1443763: Update documentation and/or implentation of pt-archiver --check-interval
    Fixed the documentation for --check-interval to reflect its correct behavior.
  • Fixed bug 1449226: pt-archiver dies with “MySQL server has gone away” when --innodb_kill_idle_transaction is set to a low value and --check-slave-lag is enabled
    The tool now sends a dummy SQL query to avoid timing out.
  • Fixed bug 1446928: pt-online-schema-change not reporting meaningful errors
    The tool now produces meaningful errors based on text from MySQL errors.
  • Fixed bug 1450499: ReadKeyMini causes pt-online-schema-change session to lock under some circumstances
    Removed ReadKeyMini, because it is no longer necessary.
  • Fixed bug 1452914: --purge and --no-delete are mutually exclusive, but still allowed to be specified together by pt-archiver
    The tool now issues an error when --purge and --no-delete are specified together.
  • Fixed bug 1455486: pt-mysql-summary is missing the --ask-pass option
    Added the --ask-pass option to the tool.
  • Fixed bug 1457573: pt-mysql-summary fails to download pt-diskstats pt-pmp pt-mext pt-align
    Added the -L option to curl and changed download address to use HTTPS.
  • Fixed bug 1462904: pt-duplicate-key-checker doesn’t support triple quote in column name
    Updated TableParser module to handle literal backticks.
  • Fixed bug 1488600: pt-stalk doesn’t check TokuDB status
    Implemented status collection similar to how it is performed for InnoDB.
  • Fixed bug 1488611: various testing bugs related to newer Perl versions

Details of the release can be found in the release notes and the 2.2.15 milestone on Launchpad. Bugs can be reported on the Percona Toolkit launchpad bug tracker.

The post Percona Toolkit 2.2.15 is now available appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Read more at: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.5 release

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.5.

Changelog:

  • Added more DB instance classes to pmp-check-aws-rds.py (issue 1398911)
  • Added configurable query period and average time to pmp-check-aws-rds.py (issue 1436943)
  • Added region support to pmp-check-aws-rds.py (issue 1442980)
  • Added an option to alert when server is not configured as replica to pmp-check-mysql-replication-delay (issue 1357017)
  • Improved usage of lock-free SHOW SLAVE STATUS query (issue 1380690)
  • Fixed reporting of slave lag in ss_get_mysql_stats.php (issue 1389769)

We have also moved the code to Github https://github.com/percona/percona-monitoring-plugins but the bug tracker is still on Launchpad https://bugs.launchpad.net/percona-monitoring-plugins.

A new tarball is available from downloads area or in packages from our software repositories. The plugins are fully supported for customers with a Percona Support contract and free installation services are provided as part of some contracts. In addition as part of Percona’s Remote DBA installation and setup of these tools are included with our services. You can find links to the documentation, forums and more at the project homepage.

Percona Monitoring PluginsAbout Percona Monitoring Plugins
Percona Monitoring Plugins are high-quality components to add enterprise-grade MySQL monitoring and graphing capabilities to your existing in-house, on-premises monitoring solutions. The components are designed to integrate seamlessly with widely deployed solutions such as Nagios, Cacti and Zabbix.

The post Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.5 release appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Read more at: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.4 release

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.4.

Changelog:

* Added login-path support to Nagios plugins with MySQL client 5.6 (bug 1338549)
* Added a new threshold option for delayed slaves to pmp-check-mysql-replication-delay (bug 1318280)
* Added delayed slave support to pmp-check-mysql-replication-running (bug 1332082)
* Updated Nagios plugins and Cacti script to leverage lock-free SHOW SLAVE STATUS in Percona Server (bug 1297442)
* Fixed pmp-check-mysql-replication-delay integer-float issue with MariaDB and MySQL 5.6 (bugs 1245934, 1295795)
* ss_get_rds_stats.py was not installed with 755 permissions from the package (bug 1316943)
* Cacti MySQL template item “handler_savepoint_rollback” was GAUGE type instead of DERIVE (bug 1334173)
* Fixed Zabbix running-slave check issue on some Debian systems (bug 1310723)

A new tarball is available from downloads area or RPM and DEB packages from our software repositories. The plugins are fully supported for customers with a Percona Support contract and free installation services are provided as part of some contracts. In addition as part of Percona’s Remote DBA installation and setup of these tools are included with our services. You can find links to the documentation, forums and more at the project homepage.

Percona Monitoring PluginsAbout Percona Monitoring Plugins
Percona Monitoring Plugins are high-quality components to add enterprise-grade MySQL monitoring and graphing capabilities to your existing in-house, on-premises monitoring solutions. The components are designed to integrate seamlessly with widely deployed solutions such as Nagios, Cacti and Zabbix and are delivered in the form of templates, plugins, and scripts which make it easy to monitor MySQL performance.

The post Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.4 release appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Read more at: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.19-25.6 is now available

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.19-25.6Percona is glad to announce the new release of Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6 on July 21st 2014. Binaries are available from downloads area or from our software repositories. We’re also happy to announce that Ubuntu 14.04 LTS users can now download, install, and upgrade Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6 from Percona’s software repositories.

Based on Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 including all the bug fixes in it, Galera Replicator 3.6, and on Codership wsrep API 25.6, Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.19-25.6 is now the current General Availability release. All of Percona‘s software is open-source and free, and all the details of the release can be found in the 5.6.19-25.6 milestone at Launchpad.

New Features:

  • Percona XtraDB Cluster now supports storing the Primary Component state to disk by setting the pc.recovery variable to true. The Primary Component can then recover automatically when all nodes that were part of the last saved state reestablish communications with each other. This feature can be used for automatic recovery from full cluster crashes, such as in the case of a data center power outage and graceful full cluster restarts without the need for explicitly bootstrapping a new Primary Component.
  • When joining the cluster, the state message exchange provides us with gcache seqno limits. That information is now used to choose a donor through IST first, and, if this is not possible, only then SST is attempted. The wsrep_sst_donor setting is honored, though, and it is also segment aware.
  • An asynchronous replication slave thread was stopped when the node tried to apply the next replication event while the node was in non-primary state. But it would then remain stopped after the node successfully re-joined the cluster. A new variable, wsrep_restart_slave, has been implemented which controls if the MySQL slave should be restarted automatically when the node re-joins the cluster.
  • Handling install message and install state message processing has been improved to make group forming a more stable process in cases when many nodes are joining the cluster.
  • A new wsrep_evs_repl_latency status variable has been implemented which provides the group communication replication latency information.
  • Node consistency issues with foreign key grammar have been fixed. This fix introduces two new variables: wsrep_slave_FK_checks and wsrep_slave_UK_checks. These variables are set to TRUE and FALSE respectively by default. They control whether Foreign Key and Unique Key checking is done for applier threads.

Bugs Fixed:

  • Fixed the race condition in Foreign Key processing that could cause assertion. Bug fixed #1342959.
  • The restart sequence in scripts/mysql.server would fail to capture and return if the start call failed to start the server. As a result, a restart could occur that failed upon start-up, and the script would still return 0 as if it worked without any issues. Bug fixed #1339894.
  • Updating a unique key value could cause the server to hang if a slave node had enabled parallel slaves. Bug fixed #1280896.
  • Percona XtraDB Cluster has implemented threadpool scheduling fixes. Bug fixed #1333348.
  • garbd was returning an incorrect return code, ie. when garbd was already started, return code was 0. Bug fixed #1308103.
  • rsync SST would silently fail on joiner when the rsync server port was already taken. Bug fixed #1099783.
  • When gmcast.listen_addr was configured to a certain address, the local connection point for outgoing connections was not bound to the listen address. This would happen if the OS has multiple interfaces with IP addresses in the same subnet. The OS would pick the wrong IP for a local connection point and other nodes would see connections originating from an IP address which was not listened to. Bug fixed #1240964.
  • An issue with re-setting galera provider (in wsrep_provider_options) has been fixed. Bug fixed #1260283.
  • Variable wsrep_provider_options couldn’t be set in runtime if no provider was loaded. Bug fixed #1260290.
  • Percona XtraDB Cluster couldn’t be built with Bison 3.0. Bug fixed #1262439.
  • MySQL wasn’t handling exceeding the max writeset size wsrep error correctly. Bug fixed #1270920.
  • Fixed the issue which caused a node to hang/fail when SELECTs/SHOW STATUS was run after FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK was used on a node with wsrep_causal_reads set to 1 while there was a DML on other nodes. Bug fixed #1271177.
  • Lowest group communication layer (evs) would fail to handle the situation properly when a large number of nodes would suddenly start recognizing each other. Bugs fixed #1271918 and #1249805.
  • Percona XtraBackup SST would fail if the progress option was used with a large number of files. Bug fixed #1294431.

NOTE: When performing an upgrade from an older 5.6 version on Debian/Ubuntu systems, in order to upgrade the Galera package correctly, you’ll need to pin the Percona repository and run: apt-get install percona-xtradb-cluster-56. This is required because older Galera deb packages have an incorrect version number. The correct wsrep_provider_version after upgrade should be 3.6(r3a949e6).

This release contains 50 fixed bugs. The complete list of fixed bugs can be found in our release notes.

Release notes for Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.19-25.6 are available in our online documentation along with the installation and upgrade instructions.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system. As always, thanks for your continued support of Percona!

Percona XtraDB Cluster Errata can be found in our documentation.

[UPDATE 2014-07-24]: Package Percona-XtraDB-Cluster-client-56-5.6.19-25.6.824.el6.x86_64.rpm has been updated to resolve the conflict with Percona-XtraDB-Cluster-devel package.

The post Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.19-25.6 is now available appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 with TokuDB (GA) now available

Percona ServerPercona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 on July 1, 2014. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or from the Percona Software Repositories.

Based on MySQL 5.6.19, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 is the current GA release in the Percona Server 5.6 series. All of Percona’s software is open-source and free. Complete details of this release can be found in the 5.6.19-67.0 milestone on Launchpad.

New Features:

  • Percona has merged a contributed patch by Kostja Osipov implementing the Multiple user level locks per connection feature. This feature fixes the upstream bugs: #1118 and #67806.
  • TokuDB storage engine support is now considered general availability (GA) quality. The TokuDB storage engine from Tokutek improves scalability and the operational efficiency of MySQL with faster performance and increased compression. It is available as a separate package and can be installed along with the Percona Server by following the instructions in the release documentation.
  • Percona Server now supports the MTR --valgrind option for a server that is either statically or dynamically linked with jemalloc.

Bugs Fixed:

  • The libperconaserverclient18.1 package was missing the library files. Bug fixed #1329911.
  • Percona Server introduced a regression in 5.6.17-66.0 when support for TokuDB storage engine was initially introduced. This regression caused spurious “wrong table structure” errors for PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA tables. Bug fixed #1329772.
  • Race condition in group commit code could lead to a race condition in PFS instrumentation code resulting in a server crash. Bug fixed #1309026 (upstream #72681).

Other bugs fixed: #1326348 and #1167486.

NOTE: There was no Percona Server 5.6.18 release because there was no MySQL Community Server 5.6.18 release. That version number was used for a MySQL Enterprise Edition release to address the OpenSSL “Heartbleed” issue.

Release notes for Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 are available in the online documentation. Please report any bugs on the launchpad bug tracker.

The post Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 with TokuDB (GA) now available appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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