Percona Live Europe 2015! Call for speakers; registration open

Percona Live Europe 2015! Call for speakers; registration now openPercona Live is moving from London to Amsterdam this year and the event is also expanding to three full days. Percona Live Europe 2015, September 21-23, will be at the Mövenpick Hotel Amsterdam City Centre. The call for speakers and Super Saver registration are now open. Hurry though because the deadline for submitting a speaking proposal is June 21st and Super Saver registration ends July 5th!

This year’s conference will feature one day of tutorials and two days of keynote talks and breakout sessions related to MySQL, NoSQL and Data in the Cloud. You’ll get briefed on the hottest topics, learn about operating a high-performing deployment and hear from top-industry leaders describe the future of the ecosystem – encompassing MySQL, MariaDB, Percona Server, MongoDB (and more). Attendees include DBAs, sysadmins, developers, architects, CTOs, CEOs, and vendors from around the world.

Have something to say? Why not lead a breakout session or a tutorial?

Breakout sessions are 50 minutes including a Q&A. Tutorial sessions focus on an immediate and practical application of in-depth MySQL and NoSQL knowledge. Tutorial speakers should assume that attendees will have laptops to work through detailed and potentially hands-on presentations. Tutorials are typically three hours long including a Q&A, however, if you have content for a full day, submissions for 6-hour-long tutorials are also being accepted. If your tutorial or breakout session is approved, you’ll receive a complimentary full-conference pass.

Huge thanks to our Conference Committee!

There would be no Percona Live without the hard work of our conference committees. Meet this year’s Percona Live Europe 2015 Conference Committee – a dedicated group of experts in MySQL, NoSQL and Data in the Cloud:

  • Erik Beebe – Founder and CTO, ObjectRocket
  • Luis Motta Campos – Database Administrator, ebay Classifieds Group
  • Colin Charles – Chief Evangelist, MariaDB
  • César Trigo Esteban – Development Director, Gigigo
  • Kenny Gorman – Chief Technologist; Data. Office of the CTO, Rackspace
  • Amrith Kumar – Founder and CTO, Tesora
  • Giuseppe Maxia – Quality Assurance Architect, VMWare
  • Shlomi Noach – Senior Systems Engineer, Booking.com
  • Konstantin Osipov – Engineering Manager, Mail.Ru
  • Morgan Tocker – MySQL Community Manager, Oracle
  • Art van Scheppingen – Head of Database Engineering, Spil Games
  • Charity Majors- Production Engineering Manager, Facebook
  • Peter Zaitsev – Co-founder and CEO, Percona

Sponsorships

Sponsorship opportunities for Percona Live Europe 2015 are now available. Sponsors become part of a dynamic and fast-growing ecosystem and interact with hundreds of DBAs, sysadmins, developers, CTOs, CEOs, business managers, technology evangelists, solution vendors, and entrepreneurs who typically attend the event. This year’s conference will feature expanded accommodations and turnkey kiosks.

Planning to attend?

Super Saver registration discounts for Percona Live Europe 2015 are available through July 5th (at 11:30 p.m. CEST). Visit the Percona Live Europe 2015 website for more information about the conference. Interested community members can also register to receive email updates about Percona Live Europe 2015.

Percona has also negotiated a special hotel rate at the Mövenpick Hotel Amsterdam City Centre. If you book your hotel before July 6th your delicious breakfast is included.

I hope to see you in Amsterdam!

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A conversation with 5 Facebook MySQL gurus

A conversation with 6 Facebook MySQL gurusFacebook, the undisputed king of online social networks, has 1.23 billion monthly active users collectively contributing to an ocean of data-intensive tasks – making the company one of the world’s top MySQL users.

A small army of Facebook MySQL experts will be converging on Santa Clara, Calif. next week where several of them are leading sessions at the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo. I had the chance to chat virtually with four of them about their sessions: Steaphan Greene, Evan Elias, Shlomo Priymak and Yoshinori MatsunobuMark Callaghan, who spoke at Percona Live last year, also joined our conversation which included a discussion of Facebook’s use of MySQL and other open source technologies.


Tom: What’s Facebook’s view of Open Source?

Steaphan: Facebook was built on open source software, and we still invest heavily in open source today. We understand the power these communities have to drive innovation – they allow us to focus on new challenges, as opposed to reinventing the wheel over and over again. And contributing as much as possible back to open projects is in everyone’s best interest.


Tom: Why MySQL? Wouldn’t NoSQL databases, for example, be better suited for the massive workloads seen at Facebook?

Mark: MySQL is great for many of our important workloads. We make it even better with our expertise in MySQL operations and engineering, and by working with the community and learning from their experience.

Yoshinori: I have not been able to find a transactional NoSQL database better than InnoDB. And it’s easy to understand how MySQL Replication works, which makes much easier to fix problems in production.


 Tom: How does Facebook make MySQL scale?

Steaphan: Sharding, automation, monitoring, and heavy investment in operations and performance engineering.


 Tom: What other things help Facebook run smoothly?

Steaphan: Our completely open culture, and the freedom all engineers here have to try any idea they have.


Tom: What is the top scaling challenge(s) Facebook faces in 2014 – and beyond?

Mark: Our biggest challenge is to make things better (performance, efficiency, availability) in the future at the rate we made things better in the past.

Yoshinori: Availability has improved a lot so far for us. Come to my session at Percona Live to hear about that. For me personally, efficiency is the biggest challenge for 2014 and 2015. This includes reducing space and optimizing for newer-generation hardware.


Tom: Facebook deployed MySQL 5.6 last year – including on critical environments – long before many other large organizations. What prompted such a move so soon? And where there any major concerns?

Steaphan: The same thing that prompts most efforts on the Facebook infra team: We will consider any technology that will help us improve performance, efficiency, or reliability, and we’re willing to accept the risk that sometimes comes along with adopting things like 5.6 very early on. But that’s only half the story here. The other half is that Facebook encourages its engineers to go after big bets like these — in this case it was just one engineer who made this happen. And we had the MySQL engineering talent we needed to work with the Oracle team to get 5.6 ready for production at our scale.

Yoshinori: At Facebook, we have three MySQL teams — Operations, Performance and Engineering. Facebook is one of the very few MySQL users that has internal MySQL developers. We all worked hard to adapt 5.6 to our scale and ensure that it would be production-ready. We found some issues after production deployment, but in many cases we could fix the problem and deployed new MySQL binary within one or two days. When deploying in production, we expected that we encountered MySQL 5.6 specific issues, which was typical when releasing new software. We were just confident that we could fix issues immediately.

Our 5.6 deployment step was not all at once. At first rollout, we disabled most major 5.6 features, such as GTID and binlog checksum. We gradually enabled such features in production.


Tom: Where there any significant issues in that move to MySQL 5.6? Any lessons learned you like to share – along with best practices you’d like to share?

Yoshinori: Performance regression of the CPU intensive replication was a main blocker for some of our applications. I wrote a blog post about this last year. We have several design plans to fix the problem on MySQL side. One of the most effective plans is grouping multiple transactions into one, since the most expensive part is writing to InnoDB system table at transaction commit. This optimization would be done when writing binary log, or by SQL thread. It may take longer time to test and deploy in production. For existing applications, we optimized to group multiple transactions from application side to mitigate the problem.


Tom: Performance monitoring is usually challenging at any organization. How do you do that at Facebook, which has tens of thousands of MySQL instances?

Yoshinori: Top-N monitoring is very important for managing a huge number of instances. Average statistics (for example: average innodb_rows_read across all instances) is not always useful since ~1% of problematic instances won’t noticeably change average numbers. p99 gives better indicators, but in our environment we typically have fewer than 0.1% instances causing problems, in which case p99 is not helpful either. We have several graphical and command-line tools to efficiently list up top-N bad behaving hosts. After listing up bad instances, the way to investigate root cause is pretty straightforward, like what MySQL consultants usually do. Server failure is something we expect and plan for at Facebook. For example, typical MySQL DBA at small companies may not encounter master instance failure during employment, because recent mysqld and H/W are stable enough. At Facebook, master failure is a norm and something the system can accommodate.


Tom: Evan, you and Yoshinori will present on Global Transaction ID (GTID) at Facebook. GTID is very tricky to deploy to an existing large-scale environment – how, and why, did you decide on adopting it?

Evan: Our primary motivations for adopting GTID all relate to either failover or binlog backups. When a master fails, getting replicas in sync with GTID is substantially simpler, faster, and less error-prone than previous methods of diffing binlogs. For backups, GTID is a cornerstone in building cross-datacenter point-in-time recovery, without needing redundant binlog streams from every region.

The “how” question is a bit more involved, and we’ll be covering this in detail during the session. The GTID project was a joint effort between three of Facebook’s MySQL teams. Santosh added new functionality to the MySQL server to make online rollout possible, and Yoshinori improved MHA to seamlessly support GTID-based failover. I added GTID support to all of our other in-house automation, and also scripted the rollout procedure across our many thousands of replica sets. A lot of validation logic and monitoring functionality was involved to ensure the safety of the rollout.


Tom: Shlomo, your session is titled “Under the Hood – MySQL Pool Scanner (MPS).” As you point out in your talk, Facebook has one of the largest MySQL database clusters in the world, comprising thousands of servers across multiple data centers. You must have an army of DBAs – or is there some secret you’d like to share? 

Shlomo: We do have an army, yes — it’s an “army of one.” We have one person on call on the MySQL Operations team at a given time, and they don’t even need to do all that much most days. We built “robots” to do our day to day jobs. The largest and most complex robot we have is MPS, an automated system to do most of the work a DBA might otherwise spend time on, such as replacement of broken or overflowing servers. Among other things, MPS also allows a human to initiate complex bulk operations with a few keystrokes, and it will follow up and complete the operations over the course of days or weeks.

I’ll be describing some of the complex MySQL automation systems we have at Facebook, and how they fit together during my talk.


Tom: Shlomo, what does a typical day look like for you there at Facebook?

Shlomo: The team’s work mostly focuses on maintaining those robots I’ve mentioned, as well as developing new ways to improve the reliability of our databases for Facebook’s users. This year the team also spent a lot of time making sure the new MySQL features such as GTIDs and semi-sync are deeply integrated in our automation. Every day, we work hard to to make ourselves obsolete, but we haven’t gotten there just yet!

On a typical day, I probably spend much of the time coding, mainly in Python. I also spend a significant amount of time working on capacity-related projects, such as thinking of ways to optimize the way we distribute the data across our fleet of servers.
Even after 2.5 years at Facebook, I am still in awe of the number of servers we manage. The typical small-scale maintenance operation at Facebook probably involves more servers than all the companies I’ve previously worked for had, combined. It really is pretty amazing!


Tom:  What are you looking forward to the most at this year’s conference?

Evan: There are plenty of fascinating sessions this year. Just to mention a handful: Jeremy Cole and Davi Arnaut’s session on innodb_ruby, since it’s a very unique way to interactively learn about InnoDB’s internals. Baron Schwartz’s session on using Go with MySQL, as VividCortex is blazing the trail here. Peter Boros and Kenny Gryp’s talk on scalability and benchmarking, which I’m hoping will include recent developments of Percona Playback. Tom Christ’s session on my former project Jetpants, to see how it has evolved over the past year at Tumblr. And several talks by Oracle engineers about upcoming functionality in MySQL 5.7.

Steaphan: In addition to the conference sessions, I look forward to the birds of a feather session with the MySQL team.  Last year, it proved to be a valuable opportunity to engage with those upstream developers who make the changes we care about, and I expect the same this year.


Tom: If you could talk to a DBA or developer on the fence about attending this year’s conference, what would be your top 3-5 reasons for making it over to Santa Clara for this event?

Evan: I’m based in NYC, so I’m traveling a bit further than many of my colleagues, but I can still confidently say that Percona Live is well worth the trip. The MySQL ecosystem is very healthy and constantly evolving, and the conference is the best place to learn about ongoing developments across a wide spectrum of companies and contributors. It’s also a perfect opportunity to personally connect with all of the amazing engineers, DBAs, users, and vendors that make MySQL so unique and compelling.


 The Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014 runs April 1-4 in Santa Clara, Calif. Use the code “SeeMeSpeak” when registering and save 10 percent. The inaugural Open Source Appreciation Day is on March 31 – this full-day event is free but because space is limited I suggest registering now to reserve your spot.

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Facebook’s Yoshinori Matsunobu on MySQL, WebScaleSQL & Percona Live

Facebook's Yoshinori Matsunobu

Facebook’s Yoshinori Matsunobu

I spoke with Facebook database engineer Yoshinori Matsunobu here at Percona Live 2014 today about a range of topics, including MySQL at Facebook, the company’s recent move to WebScaleSQL, new MySQL flash storage technologies – and why attending the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo each year is very important to him.

Facebook engineers are hosting several sessions at this year’s conference and all have been standing room only. That’s not too surprising considering that Facebook, the undisputed king of online social networks, has 1.23 billion monthly active users collectively contributing to an ocean of data-intensive tasks – making the company one of the world’s top MySQL users. And they are sharing what they’ve learned in doing so this week.

You can read my previous post where I interviewed five Facebook MySQL experts (Steaphan Greene, Evan Elias, Shlomo Priymak, Yoshinori Matsunobu and Mark Callaghan) and below is my short video interview with Yoshi, who will lead his third and final session of the conference today at 12:50 p.m. Pacific time titled, “Global Transaction ID at Facebook.”

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New MySQL features, related technologies at Percona Live London

Call for papers: Percona Live LondonThe upcoming Percona Live London conference, November 11-12, features quite a number of talks about the latest MySQL features and related technologies. There will be a lots of talks about the new MySQL 5.6 features:

  • Opening keynote highlights MySQL 5.6 new features.
  • New InnoDB Compression talk will cover the new compression algorithm, implemented by Facebook and included in MySQL 5.6.
  • New MySQL Replication features, including multi-treaded slave applier, Global Transaction Ids which can help for automatic failover and lots of performance optimizations and much).

Altho MySQL 5.6 is a very important milestone there are much more interesting technologies going on around MySQL. Here are some of the talks, which look pretty interesting (at least for me):

NoSQL World

Hadoop

Hadoop is a relatively new topic at MySQL conferences, however, it gains more and more traction, especially after MySQL applier for Hadoop (alpha version) release. Danil  Zburivsky will be talking about building a data warehouse with Hadoop and MySQL. I personally have a strong interest in Hadoop and recently  did a webinar about this topic. Hadoop concept is very different from MySQL, but there are a lots of real use cases where Hadoop will fit best.

MongoDB

MongoDB is a another interesting technology. There will be full MongoDB tutorial by Stephane Combaudon as well as MongoDB for MySQL Guru talk by Robert Hodges (Continuent) and Tim Callaghan (Tokutek)

New MySQL Cluster features.

MySQL Cluster 7.3 (based on  a mainline MySQL Server 5.6 release + NDBCluster storage engine) was recently released. Johan Andersson will cover some new MySQL Cluster 7.3 features in his MySQL Cluster Performance Tuning talk, including foreign key constrains (Foreign key constrains were the “showstopper” for many customers), memcached integration, etc. I knew Johan from the early MySQL Ab days and he always was (and now is) “the MySQL Cluster guy”, so I’m sure he will show some new MySQL cluster magic.

Other Storage Engines

TokuDB features the fractal tree and compression. Vadim blogged about using TokuDB  for storing timeseries data and it looks promising. Tim Callaghan of Tokutek will talk about Fractal Tree Indexes.

MariaDB contains the CONNECT engine (to join data between Oracle and Cassandra for example) and SPIDER storage engine (for automatic “sharding”). Colin Charles from Monty Program Ab will talk about new MariaDB features

Percona Live London is approaching fast so be sure to register today!

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