Parallel queries in PostgreSQL

parallel queries in postgresql

PostgreSQL logoModern CPU models have a huge number of cores. For many years, applications have been sending queries in parallel to databases. Where there are reporting queries that deal with many table rows, the ability for a query to use multiple CPUs helps us with a faster execution. Parallel queries in PostgreSQL allow us to utilize many CPUs to finish report queries faster. The parallel queries feature was implemented in 9.6 and helps. Starting from PostgreSQL 9.6 a report query is able to use many CPUs and finish faster.

The initial implementation of the parallel queries execution took three years. Parallel support requires code changes in many query execution stages. PostgreSQL 9.6 created an infrastructure for further code improvements. Later versions extended parallel execution support for other query types.

Limitations

  • Do not enable parallel executions if all CPU cores are already saturated. Parallel execution steals CPU time from other queries, and increases response time.
  • Most importantly, parallel processing significantly increases memory usage with high WORK_MEM values, as each hash join or sort operation takes a work_mem amount of memory.
  • Next, low latency OLTP queries can’t be made any faster with parallel execution. In particular, queries that returns a single row can perform badly when parallel execution is enabled.
  • The Pierian spring for developers is a TPC-H benchmark. Check if you have similar queries for the best parallel execution.
  • Parallel execution supports only SELECT queries without lock predicates.
  • Proper indexing might be a better alternative to a parallel sequential table scan.
  • There is no support for cursors or suspended queries.
  • Windowed functions and ordered-set aggregate functions are non-parallel.
  • There is no benefit for an IO-bound workload.
  • There are no parallel sort algorithms. However, queries with sorts still can be parallel in some aspects.
  • Replace CTE (WITH …) with a sub-select to support parallel execution.
  • Foreign data wrappers do not currently support parallel execution (but they could!)
  • There is no support for FULL OUTER JOIN.
  • Clients setting max_rows disable parallel execution.
  • If a query uses a function that is not marked as PARALLEL SAFE, it will be single-threaded.
  • SERIALIZABLE transaction isolation level disables parallel execution.

Test environment

The PostgreSQL development team have tried to improve TPC-H benchmark queries’ response time. You can download the benchmark and adapt it to PostgreSQL by using these instructions. It’s not an official way to use the TPC-H benchmark, so you shouldn’t use it to compare different databases or hardware.

  1. Download TPC-H_Tools_v2.17.3.zip (or newer version) from official TPC site.
  2. Rename makefile.suite to Makefile and modify it as requested at https://github.com/tvondra/pg_tpch . Compile the code with make command
  3. Generate data: ./dbgen -s 10 generates 23GB database which is enough to see the difference in performance for parallel and non-parallel queries.
  4. Convert tbl files to csv with for + sed
  5. Clone pg_tpch repository and copy csv files to pg_tpch/dss/data
  6. Generate queries with qgen command
  7. Load data to the database with ./tpch.sh command.

Parallel sequential scan

This might be faster not because of parallel reads, but due to scattering of data across many CPU cores. Modern OS provides good caching for PostgreSQL data files. Read-ahead allows getting a block from storage more than just the block requested by PG daemon. As a result, query performance is not limited due to disk IO. It consumes CPU cycles for:

  • reading rows one by one from table data pages
  • comparing row values and WHERE conditions

Let’s try to execute simple select query:

tpch=# explain analyze select l_quantity as sum_qty from lineitem where l_shipdate <= date '1998-12-01' - interval '105' day;
QUERY PLAN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Seq Scan on lineitem (cost=0.00..1964772.00 rows=58856235 width=5) (actual time=0.014..16951.669 rows=58839715 loops=1)
Filter: (l_shipdate <= '1998-08-18 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone)
Rows Removed by Filter: 1146337
Planning Time: 0.203 ms
Execution Time: 19035.100 ms

A sequential scan produces too many rows without aggregation. So, the query is executed by a single CPU core.

After adding SUM(), it’s clear to see that two workers will help us to make the query faster:

explain analyze select sum(l_quantity) as sum_qty from lineitem where l_shipdate <= date '1998-12-01' - interval '105' day;
QUERY PLAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finalize Aggregate (cost=1589702.14..1589702.15 rows=1 width=32) (actual time=8553.365..8553.365 rows=1 loops=1)
-> Gather (cost=1589701.91..1589702.12 rows=2 width=32) (actual time=8553.241..8555.067 rows=3 loops=1)
Workers Planned: 2
Workers Launched: 2
-> Partial Aggregate (cost=1588701.91..1588701.92 rows=1 width=32) (actual time=8547.546..8547.546 rows=1 loops=3)
-> Parallel Seq Scan on lineitem (cost=0.00..1527393.33 rows=24523431 width=5) (actual time=0.038..5998.417 rows=19613238 loops=3)
Filter: (l_shipdate <= '1998-08-18 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone)
Rows Removed by Filter: 382112
Planning Time: 0.241 ms
Execution Time: 8555.131 ms

The more complex query is 2.2X faster compared to the plain, single-threaded select.

Parallel Aggregation

A “Parallel Seq Scan” node produces rows for partial aggregation. A “Partial Aggregate” node reduces these rows with SUM(). At the end, the SUM counter from each worker collected by “Gather” node.

The final result is calculated by the “Finalize Aggregate” node. If you have your own aggregation functions, do not forget to mark them as “parallel safe”.

Number of workers

We can increase the number of workers without server restart:

alter system set max_parallel_workers_per_gather=4;
select * from pg_reload_conf();
Now, there are 4 workers in explain output:
tpch=# explain analyze select sum(l_quantity) as sum_qty from lineitem where l_shipdate <= date '1998-12-01' - interval '105' day;
QUERY PLAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finalize Aggregate (cost=1440213.58..1440213.59 rows=1 width=32) (actual time=5152.072..5152.072 rows=1 loops=1)
-> Gather (cost=1440213.15..1440213.56 rows=4 width=32) (actual time=5151.807..5153.900 rows=5 loops=1)
Workers Planned: 4
Workers Launched: 4
-> Partial Aggregate (cost=1439213.15..1439213.16 rows=1 width=32) (actual time=5147.238..5147.239 rows=1 loops=5)
-> Parallel Seq Scan on lineitem (cost=0.00..1402428.00 rows=14714059 width=5) (actual time=0.037..3601.882 rows=11767943 loops=5)
Filter: (l_shipdate <= '1998-08-18 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone)
Rows Removed by Filter: 229267
Planning Time: 0.218 ms
Execution Time: 5153.967 ms

What’s happening here? We have changed the number of workers from 2 to 4, but the query became only 1.6599 times faster. Actually, scaling is amazing. We had two workers plus one leader. After a configuration change, it becomes 4+1.

The biggest improvement from parallel execution that we can achieve is: 5/3 = 1.66(6)X faster.

How does it work?

Processes

Query execution always starts in the “leader” process. A leader executes all non-parallel activity and its own contribution to parallel processing. Other processes executing the same queries are called “worker” processes. Parallel execution utilizes the Dynamic Background Workers infrastructure (added in 9.4). As other parts of PostgreSQL uses processes, but not threads, the query creating three worker processes could be 4X faster than the traditional execution.

Communication

Workers communicate with the leader using a message queue (based on shared memory). Each process has two queues: one for errors and the second one for tuples.

How many workers to use?

Firstly, the max_parallel_workers_per_gather parameter is the smallest limit on the number of workers. Secondly, the query executor takes workers from the pool limited by max_parallel_workers size. Finally, the top-level limit is max_worker_processes: the total number of background processes.

Failed worker allocation leads to single-process execution.

The query planner could consider decreasing the number of workers based on a table or index size. min_parallel_table_scan_size and min_parallel_index_scan_size control this behavior.

set min_parallel_table_scan_size='8MB'
8MB table => 1 worker
24MB table => 2 workers
72MB table => 3 workers
x => log(x / min_parallel_table_scan_size) / log(3) + 1 worker

Each time the table is 3X bigger than min_parallel_(index|table)_scan_size, postgres adds a worker. The number of workers is not cost-based! A circular dependency makes a complex implementation hard. Instead, the planner uses simple rules.

In practice, these rules are not always acceptable in production and you can override the number of workers for the specific table with ALTER TABLE … SET (parallel_workers = N).

Why parallel execution is not used?

Besides to the long list of parallel execution limitations, PostgreSQL checks costs:

parallel_setup_cost to avoid parallel execution for short queries. It models the time spent for memory setup, process start, and initial communication

parallel_tuple_cost : The communication between leader and workers could take a long time. The time is proportional to the number of tuples sent by workers. The parameter models the communication cost.

Nested loop joins

PostgreSQL 9.6+ could execute a “Nested loop” in parallel due to the simplicity of the operation.

explain (costs off) select c_custkey, count(o_orderkey)
                from    customer left outer join orders on
                                c_custkey = o_custkey and o_comment not like '%special%deposits%'
                group by c_custkey;
                                      QUERY PLAN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Finalize GroupAggregate
   Group Key: customer.c_custkey
   ->  Gather Merge
         Workers Planned: 4
         ->  Partial GroupAggregate
               Group Key: customer.c_custkey
               ->  Nested Loop Left Join
                     ->  Parallel Index Only Scan using customer_pkey on customer
                     ->  Index Scan using idx_orders_custkey on orders
                           Index Cond: (customer.c_custkey = o_custkey)
                           Filter: ((o_comment)::text !~~ '%special%deposits%'::text)

Gather happens in the last stage, so “Nested Loop Left Join” is a parallel operation. “Parallel Index Only Scan” is available from version 10. It acts in a similar way to a parallel sequential scan. The

c_custkey = o_custkey

condition reads a single order for each customer row. Thus it’s not parallel.

Hash Join

Each worker builds its own hash table until PostgreSQL 11. As a result, 4+ workers weren’t able to improve performance. The new implementation uses a shared hash table. Each worker can utilize WORK_MEM to build the hash table.

select
        l_shipmode,
        sum(case
                when o_orderpriority = '1-URGENT'
                        or o_orderpriority = '2-HIGH'
                        then 1
                else 0
        end) as high_line_count,
        sum(case
                when o_orderpriority <> '1-URGENT'
                        and o_orderpriority <> '2-HIGH'
                        then 1
                else 0
        end) as low_line_count
from
        orders,
        lineitem
where
        o_orderkey = l_orderkey
        and l_shipmode in ('MAIL', 'AIR')
        and l_commitdate < l_receiptdate
        and l_shipdate < l_commitdate
        and l_receiptdate >= date '1996-01-01'
        and l_receiptdate < date '1996-01-01' + interval '1' year
group by
        l_shipmode
order by
        l_shipmode
LIMIT 1;
                                                                                                                                    QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=1964755.66..1964961.44 rows=1 width=27) (actual time=7579.592..7922.997 rows=1 loops=1)
   ->  Finalize GroupAggregate  (cost=1964755.66..1966196.11 rows=7 width=27) (actual time=7579.590..7579.591 rows=1 loops=1)
         Group Key: lineitem.l_shipmode
         ->  Gather Merge  (cost=1964755.66..1966195.83 rows=28 width=27) (actual time=7559.593..7922.319 rows=6 loops=1)
               Workers Planned: 4
               Workers Launched: 4
               ->  Partial GroupAggregate  (cost=1963755.61..1965192.44 rows=7 width=27) (actual time=7548.103..7564.592 rows=2 loops=5)
                     Group Key: lineitem.l_shipmode
                     ->  Sort  (cost=1963755.61..1963935.20 rows=71838 width=27) (actual time=7530.280..7539.688 rows=62519 loops=5)
                           Sort Key: lineitem.l_shipmode
                           Sort Method: external merge  Disk: 2304kB
                           Worker 0:  Sort Method: external merge  Disk: 2064kB
                           Worker 1:  Sort Method: external merge  Disk: 2384kB
                           Worker 2:  Sort Method: external merge  Disk: 2264kB
                           Worker 3:  Sort Method: external merge  Disk: 2336kB
                           ->  Parallel Hash Join  (cost=382571.01..1957960.99 rows=71838 width=27) (actual time=7036.917..7499.692 rows=62519 loops=5)
                                 Hash Cond: (lineitem.l_orderkey = orders.o_orderkey)
                                 ->  Parallel Seq Scan on lineitem  (cost=0.00..1552386.40 rows=71838 width=19) (actual time=0.583..4901.063 rows=62519 loops=5)
                                       Filter: ((l_shipmode = ANY ('{MAIL,AIR}'::bpchar[])) AND (l_commitdate < l_receiptdate) AND (l_shipdate < l_commitdate) AND (l_receiptdate >= '1996-01-01'::date) AND (l_receiptdate < '1997-01-01 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone))
                                       Rows Removed by Filter: 11934691
                                 ->  Parallel Hash  (cost=313722.45..313722.45 rows=3750045 width=20) (actual time=2011.518..2011.518 rows=3000000 loops=5)
                                       Buckets: 65536  Batches: 256  Memory Usage: 3840kB
                                       ->  Parallel Seq Scan on orders  (cost=0.00..313722.45 rows=3750045 width=20) (actual time=0.029..995.948 rows=3000000 loops=5)
 Planning Time: 0.977 ms
 Execution Time: 7923.770 ms

Query 12 from TPC-H is a good illustration for a parallel hash join. Each worker helps to build a shared hash table.

Merge Join

Due to the nature of merge join it’s not possible to make it parallel. Don’t worry if it’s the last stage of the query execution—you can still can see parallel execution for queries with a merge join.

-- Query 2 from TPC-H
explain (costs off) select s_acctbal, s_name, n_name, p_partkey, p_mfgr, s_address, s_phone, s_comment
from    part, supplier, partsupp, nation, region
where
        p_partkey = ps_partkey
        and s_suppkey = ps_suppkey
        and p_size = 36
        and p_type like '%BRASS'
        and s_nationkey = n_nationkey
        and n_regionkey = r_regionkey
        and r_name = 'AMERICA'
        and ps_supplycost = (
                select
                        min(ps_supplycost)
                from    partsupp, supplier, nation, region
                where
                        p_partkey = ps_partkey
                        and s_suppkey = ps_suppkey
                        and s_nationkey = n_nationkey
                        and n_regionkey = r_regionkey
                        and r_name = 'AMERICA'
        )
order by s_acctbal desc, n_name, s_name, p_partkey
LIMIT 100;
                                                QUERY PLAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit
   -&gt;  Sort
         Sort Key: supplier.s_acctbal DESC, nation.n_name, supplier.s_name, part.p_partkey
         -&gt;  Merge Join
               Merge Cond: (part.p_partkey = partsupp.ps_partkey)
               Join Filter: (partsupp.ps_supplycost = (SubPlan 1))
               -&gt;  Gather Merge
                     Workers Planned: 4
                     -&gt;  Parallel Index Scan using <strong>part_pkey</strong> on part
                           Filter: (((p_type)::text ~~ '%BRASS'::text) AND (p_size = 36))
               -&gt;  Materialize
                     -&gt;  Sort
                           Sort Key: partsupp.ps_partkey
                           -&gt;  Nested Loop
                                 -&gt;  Nested Loop
                                       Join Filter: (nation.n_regionkey = region.r_regionkey)
                                       -&gt;  Seq Scan on region
                                             Filter: (r_name = 'AMERICA'::bpchar)
                                       -&gt;  Hash Join
                                             Hash Cond: (supplier.s_nationkey = nation.n_nationkey)
                                             -&gt;  Seq Scan on supplier
                                             -&gt;  Hash
                                                   -&gt;  Seq Scan on nation
                                 -&gt;  Index Scan using idx_partsupp_suppkey on partsupp
                                       Index Cond: (ps_suppkey = supplier.s_suppkey)
               SubPlan 1
                 -&gt;  Aggregate
                       -&gt;  Nested Loop
                             Join Filter: (nation_1.n_regionkey = region_1.r_regionkey)
                             -&gt;  Seq Scan on region region_1
                                   Filter: (r_name = 'AMERICA'::bpchar)
                             -&gt;  Nested Loop
                                   -&gt;  Nested Loop
                                         -&gt;  Index Scan using idx_partsupp_partkey on partsupp partsupp_1
                                               Index Cond: (part.p_partkey = ps_partkey)
                                         -&gt;  Index Scan using supplier_pkey on supplier supplier_1
                                               Index Cond: (s_suppkey = partsupp_1.ps_suppkey)
                                   -&gt;  Index Scan using nation_pkey on nation nation_1
                                         Index Cond: (n_nationkey = supplier_1.s_nationkey)

The “Merge Join” node is above “Gather Merge”. Thus merge is not using parallel execution. But the “Parallel Index Scan” node still helps with the part_pkey segment.

Partition-wise join

PostgreSQL 11 disables the partition-wise join feature by default. Partition-wise join has a high planning cost. Joins for similarly partitioned tables could be done partition-by-partition. This allows postgres to use smaller hash tables. Each per-partition join operation could be executed in parallel.

tpch=# set enable_partitionwise_join=t;
tpch=# explain (costs off) select * from prt1 t1, prt2 t2
where t1.a = t2.b and t1.b = 0 and t2.b between 0 and 10000;
                    QUERY PLAN
---------------------------------------------------
 Append
   ->  Hash Join
         Hash Cond: (t2.b = t1.a)
         ->  Seq Scan on prt2_p1 t2
               Filter: ((b >= 0) AND (b <= 10000))
         ->  Hash
               ->  Seq Scan on prt1_p1 t1
                     Filter: (b = 0)
   ->  Hash Join
         Hash Cond: (t2_1.b = t1_1.a)
         ->  Seq Scan on prt2_p2 t2_1
               Filter: ((b >= 0) AND (b <= 10000))
         ->  Hash
               ->  Seq Scan on prt1_p2 t1_1
                     Filter: (b = 0)
tpch=# set parallel_setup_cost = 1;
tpch=# set parallel_tuple_cost = 0.01;
tpch=# explain (costs off) select * from prt1 t1, prt2 t2
where t1.a = t2.b and t1.b = 0 and t2.b between 0 and 10000;
                        QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------
 Gather
   Workers Planned: 4
   ->  Parallel Append
         ->  Parallel Hash Join
               Hash Cond: (t2_1.b = t1_1.a)
               ->  Parallel Seq Scan on prt2_p2 t2_1
                     Filter: ((b >= 0) AND (b <= 10000))
               ->  Parallel Hash
                     ->  Parallel Seq Scan on prt1_p2 t1_1
                           Filter: (b = 0)
         ->  Parallel Hash Join
               Hash Cond: (t2.b = t1.a)
               ->  Parallel Seq Scan on prt2_p1 t2
                     Filter: ((b >= 0) AND (b <= 10000))
               ->  Parallel Hash
                     ->  Parallel Seq Scan on prt1_p1 t1
                           Filter: (b = 0)

Above all, a partition-wise join can use parallel execution only if partitions are big enough.

Parallel Append

Parallel Append partitions work instead of using different blocks in different workers. Usually, you can see this with UNION ALL queries. The drawback – less parallelism, because every worker could ultimately work for a single query.

There are just two workers launched even with four workers enabled.

tpch=# explain (costs off) select sum(l_quantity) as sum_qty from lineitem where l_shipdate <= date '1998-12-01' - interval '105' day union all select sum(l_quantity) as sum_qty from lineitem where l_shipdate <= date '2000-12-01' - interval '105' day;
                                           QUERY PLAN
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Gather
   Workers Planned: 2
   ->  Parallel Append
         ->  Aggregate
               ->  Seq Scan on lineitem
                     Filter: (l_shipdate <= '2000-08-18 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone)
         ->  Aggregate
               ->  Seq Scan on lineitem lineitem_1
                     Filter: (l_shipdate <= '1998-08-18 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone)

Most important variables

  • WORK_MEM limits the memory usage of each process! Not just for queries: work_mem * processes * joins => could lead to significant memory usage.
  • max_parallel_workers_per_gather  – how many workers an executor will use for the parallel execution of a planner node
  • max_worker_processes – adapt the total number of workers to the number of CPU cores installed on a server
  • max_parallel_workers – same for the number of parallel workers

Summary

Starting from 9.6 parallel queries execution could significantly improve performance for complex queries scanning many rows or index records. In PostgreSQL 10, parallel execution was enabled by default. Do not forget to disable parallel execution on servers with a heavy OLTP workload. Sequential scans or index scans still consume a significant amount of resources. If you are not running a report against the whole dataset, you may improve query performance just by adding missing indexes or by using proper partitioning.

References


Image compiled from photos by Nathan Gonthier and Pavel Nekoranec on Unsplash